About Purim …

When the Jews were in captivity in Persia, about 500 BC, (says Ussher) the story of the Book of Esther takes place. Esther is a Persian or Babylonian name – Hadasseh was her Jewish real name! She was beautiful in spirit as well as body – truly a Proverbs 31 woman. The celebration of deliverance told here has become known as the Biblical holiday of Purim. Pur means die/lot as in lottery. Purim or dice is the plural. It was decided by the wicked Hamen to kill all the Jews. Lots were cast to see when that should happen. The Book of Esther, all ten chapters, are read by the Jewish people on the anniversary of the first celebration, Adar 14, which comes in early spring. It’s a very important day for Christians, also, because if the wicked Haman had carried out his threat to annihilate all Jews, the Messiah would have never been born. The kingdom of Ahashvarosh covered over 127 provinces from India to Ethiopia, which was the known world at that time. No Jew is all the world was to be spared! Haman, the Agagite, was decended from the Edomite (Esau) people who have always been enemies of the Jews. King Saul was ordered to wipe them out and he failed. King Herod, in the time of Christ, was from this line. Mordecai and Hadasseh, who were from the Benjamites – same tribe as Saul, finally did it generations later. The history of the Bible is also unfulfilled prophesy. Haman is a picture of the False Messiah and he and his ten sons were destroyed just as Christians believe the anti-Christ or False Messiah and his ten heads (governments) will be destroyed someday.

Moral: Don’t mess with God’s people!

Why not get the family together and take turns reading the Book of Esther? Have a party! Dress up like the characters! Make it fun – whistle and cheer when you read Esther’s name.

Boo and hiss, make lots of noise and stamp your feet when you read the name of Haman.

Cheer for the name of Mordechai. You learn a lot more when you read the whole book at once. It’s the only Book that does not mention the name of God and was almost not included in the Bible for this reason.

A pastry treat called “Hamantashen” – a filled cookie – is served and it’s a fun time for everyone. At our house we have a life-sized cardboard box made to sorta look like “Wicked Haman” with an open mouth. We play a game throwing bagels in his mouth to see who can get the most points. Purim is about friends, kinship and community, strong bonds that last a lifetime, about remembering, and about our salvation. It’s a great time for remembering the provision God has made for us through His grace and faithfulness; a time Jews and Christians alike can celebrate the goodness of our God.

Baruch hashem Adonai – Blessed be the name of the Lord! Chag Sameach! – Have a happy Purim! – March 14, 2006

See you next time!
Shalom, Sharaka

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